Plantae

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Short, tufted grasses that are found in the woods, fields, bogs, and marshes of Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia

Agrostis spp. (Tickle Grass)

Short, tufted grasses that are found in the woods, fields, bogs, and marshes of Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia

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Agrostis spp. (Tickle Grass)

Symbol showing a tree damaged by wind, lightning strike or other disturbance

Damaged tree

Symbol showing a tree damaged by wind, lightning strike or other disturbance

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Damaged tree

Illustration of a dead tree with exposed roots

Dead tree 4

Illustration of a dead tree with exposed roots

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Dead tree 4

Illustration of deep water seagrass

Deep water seagrass

Illustration of deep water seagrass

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Deep water seagrass

Found in and around aquatic or wetland habitats, this grass is avoided by grazing feral horses on Assateague Island, Maryland, in favor of Spartina alterniflora

Distichlis spicata (Coastal Salt Grass)

Found in and around aquatic or wetland habitats, this grass is avoided by grazing feral horses on Assateague Island, Maryland, in favor of Spartina alterniflora

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Distichlis spicata (Coastal Salt Grass)

A stylized red hibiscus flower with an orange style protruding from the center of the flower. The hibiscus is the state flower of Hawaii

Hibiscus Flower

A stylized red hibiscus flower with an orange style protruding from the center of the flower. The hibiscus is the state flower of Hawaii

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Hibiscus Flower

Hymenachne was introduced into northern Queensland, Australia in the 1970s to use in ponded pastures. It escaped cultivation a few years after its release in 1988. It is spreading throughout the tropical wetlands of northern Australia and is most common in the coastal wetlands of northern Queensland and the Northern Territory

Hymenachne amplexicaulis (Olive hymenachne)

Hymenachne was introduced into northern Queensland, Australia in the 1970s to use in ponded pastures. It escaped cultivation a few years after its release in 1988. It is spreading throughout the tropical wetlands of northern Australia and is most common in the coastal wetlands of northern Queensland and the Northern Territory

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Hymenachne amplexicaulis (Olive hymenachne)

Illustration of Intsia bijuga (Ifilele), a tree used traditionally in Samoa to carve 'Ava bowls. The tree is endangered in many places in Southeast Asia due to extensive logging, and is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN

Intsia bijuga (Ifilele)

Illustration of Intsia bijuga (Ifilele), a tree used traditionally in Samoa to carve 'Ava bowls. The tree is endangered in many places in Southeast Asia due to extensive logging, and is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN

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Intsia bijuga (Ifilele)

Illustration of Merremia peltata, a common invasive on Pacific Island nations

Merremia peltata

Illustration of Merremia peltata, a common invasive on Pacific Island nations

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Merremia peltata

Illustration of moss with spore capsule

Moss 1

Illustration of moss with spore capsule

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Moss 1

Illustration of moss with spore capsule

Moss 2

Illustration of moss with spore capsule

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Moss 2

Oryza meridionalis is a wild rice indigenous to Australia. It is found at edges of freshwater lagoons, temporary pools, and swamps

Oryza meridionalis (Wild rice)

Oryza meridionalis is a wild rice indigenous to Australia. It is found at edges of freshwater lagoons, temporary pools, and swamps

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Oryza meridionalis (Wild rice)

Giant salvinia is an aquatic fern, native to south-eastern Brazil. It is a free floating plant that remains buoyant on the surface of a body of water, and is known for its capability to take over large bodies of slow-moving fresh water. The rapid growth rate of Giant Salvinia has resulted in its classification as an invasive weed in some parts of the world such as Australia, United Kingdom, New Zealand, and parts of America

Salvinia molesta (Giant Salvinia)

Giant salvinia is an aquatic fern, native to south-eastern Brazil. It is a free floating plant that remains buoyant on the surface of a body of water, and is known for its capability to take over large bodies of slow-moving fresh water. The rapid growth rate of Giant Salvinia has resulted in its classification as an invasive weed in some parts of the world such as Australia, United Kingdom, New Zealand, and parts of America

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Salvinia molesta (Giant Salvinia)

Illustration of seagrass

Seagrass

Illustration of seagrass

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Seagrass

Illustration of Spathodea campanulata (African Tulip), a common invasive species in many tropical areas, including Samoa and Fiji

Spathodea campanulata (African Tulip)

Illustration of Spathodea campanulata (African Tulip), a common invasive species in many tropical areas, including Samoa and Fiji

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Spathodea campanulata (African Tulip)