Fauna - Molluscs

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Illustration of clam

Clam

Illustration of clam

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Clam

Illustration of mussels

Mussels 1

Illustration of mussels

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Mussels 1

Illustration of mussels with attached barnacle

Mussels 2

Illustration of mussels with attached barnacle

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Mussels 2

The Mediterranean mussel is a species of bivalve, a marine mollusc in the family Mytilidae. It is an invasive species in many parts of the world, as well as an object of aquaculture in Spain and China

Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mediterranean Mussel)

The Mediterranean mussel is a species of bivalve, a marine mollusc in the family Mytilidae. It is an invasive species in many parts of the world, as well as an object of aquaculture in Spain and China

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Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mediterranean Mussel)

Illustration of octopus

Octopus

Illustration of octopus

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Octopus

Illustration of oyster

Oyster

Illustration of oyster

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Oyster

Illustration of oyster 2D reef

Oyster 2D reef

Illustration of oyster 2D reef

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Oyster 2D reef

Illustration of oyster 3D reef

Oyster 3D reef

Illustration of oyster 3D reef

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Oyster 3D reef

Illustration of oyster buried shell

Oyster buried shell

Illustration of oyster buried shell

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Oyster buried shell

Illustration of oyster dead shell

Oyster dead shell

Illustration of oyster dead shell

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Oyster dead shell

Illustration of oyster larvae

Oyster larvae

Illustration of oyster larvae

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Oyster larvae

Illustration of oyster spat on shell

Oyster spat on shell

Illustration of oyster spat on shell

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Oyster spat on shell

The Atlantic Rangia or wedge clam Rangia cuneata originates from the Gulf of Mexico. From there this bivalve colonized the Atlantic coast of North-America and Europe. The species mainly live in estuaries, brackish and freshwater. In ports, the Atlantic Rangia can become a pest as it establishes itself in industrial cooling pipes where it can obstruct optimal water flow

Rangia cuneata (Atlantic Rangia)

The Atlantic Rangia or wedge clam Rangia cuneata originates from the Gulf of Mexico. From there this bivalve colonized the Atlantic coast of North-America and Europe. The species mainly live in estuaries, brackish and freshwater. In ports, the Atlantic Rangia can become a pest as it establishes itself in industrial cooling pipes where it can obstruct optimal water flow

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Rangia cuneata (Atlantic Rangia)

Illustration of razor clam

Razor clam

Illustration of razor clam

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Razor clam

Illustration of a sea snail

Sea Snail

Illustration of a sea snail

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Sea Snail

Illustration of snail

Snail

Illustration of snail

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Snail

Illustration of squid

Squid

Illustration of squid

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Squid

The queen conch is an important cultural and economic resource for Caribbean countries, but populations are in decline due primarily to overfishing and poaching

Strombus gigas (Queen Conch)

The queen conch is an important cultural and economic resource for Caribbean countries, but populations are in decline due primarily to overfishing and poaching

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Strombus gigas (Queen Conch)

Illustration of Tridacna gigas (Giant Clam), which is classified Vulnerable by the IUCN due to overharvesting

Tridacna gigas (Giant Clam)

Illustration of Tridacna gigas (Giant Clam), which is classified Vulnerable by the IUCN due to overharvesting

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Tridacna gigas (Giant Clam)

Illustration of Trochomorpha apia, a snail endemic to Samoa and American Samoa. It is classified as Endangered by the IUCN

Trochomorpha apia

Illustration of Trochomorpha apia, a snail endemic to Samoa and American Samoa. It is classified as Endangered by the IUCN

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Trochomorpha apia

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