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Front view illustration of a Koa tree, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. There are actually two species of koa native to Hawaii. The large forest koa is well known around the world for the beautiful hard wood. Koa's smaller cousin, koai?a, that once grew in the lowlands of most of the main Hawaiian Islands, has an even harder wood that is much prized for its gnarled grain

Acacia koa (Koa tree)

Front view illustration of a Koa tree, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. There are actually two species of koa native to Hawaii. The large forest koa is well known around the world for the beautiful hard wood. Koa's smaller cousin, koai?a, that once grew in the lowlands of most of the main Hawaiian Islands, has an even harder wood that is much prized for its gnarled grain

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Acacia koa (Koa tree)

A waterbird species found in coastal northern Australia. The adult Magpie goose has black and white feathers, a long neck and a cranial knob (smaller in females). They also have orange legs with partly webbed feet, and a red beak with a white hook on the end which assists them in probing for food. The Northern Territory holds the largest populations and breeding areas of the Magpie goose with an estimated population of over 2 million individuals

Anseranas semipalmata (Magpie Goose) 2

A waterbird species found in coastal northern Australia. The adult Magpie goose has black and white feathers, a long neck and a cranial knob (smaller in females). They also have orange legs with partly webbed feet, and a red beak with a white hook on the end which assists them in probing for food. The Northern Territory holds the largest populations and breeding areas of the Magpie goose with an estimated population of over 2 million individuals

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Anseranas semipalmata (Magpie Goose) 2

Front view illustration of an Aweoweo, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. Native water and land birds (e.g., Nihoa finch), and seabirds use Aweoweo for food, nesting material or nesting sites. Early Hawaiians used the wood to form shark hooks (makau mano) fitted with bone points. Aweoweo leaves and shoots were wrapped in ti leaves, cooked and eaten in times of food scarcity by early Hawaiians

Chenopodium oahuense (Aweoweo)

Front view illustration of an Aweoweo, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. Native water and land birds (e.g., Nihoa finch), and seabirds use Aweoweo for food, nesting material or nesting sites. Early Hawaiians used the wood to form shark hooks (makau mano) fitted with bone points. Aweoweo leaves and shoots were wrapped in ti leaves, cooked and eaten in times of food scarcity by early Hawaiians

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Chenopodium oahuense (Aweoweo)

Front view of a Wiliwili tree, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. It is typically found in dry forests on leeward island slopes up to an elevation of 600 m

Erythrina sandwicensis (Wiliwili)

Front view of a Wiliwili tree, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. It is typically found in dry forests on leeward island slopes up to an elevation of 600 m

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Erythrina sandwicensis (Wiliwili)

One of the oldest handcrafts of African origin in the United States is the hand-woven winnowing sieve, a shallow basket that was used during the Colonia Era to separate the rice seed from its chaff. Made from indigenous bulrush, sweetgrass is a strong yet supple marsh grass that thrives in the sandy soil of the coastal regions of the US South Atlantic

Gullah sweetgrass basket

One of the oldest handcrafts of African origin in the United States is the hand-woven winnowing sieve, a shallow basket that was used during the Colonia Era to separate the rice seed from its chaff. Made from indigenous bulrush, sweetgrass is a strong yet supple marsh grass that thrives in the sandy soil of the coastal regions of the US South Atlantic

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Gullah sweetgrass basket

Oryza meridionalis is a wild rice indigenous to Australia. It is found at edges of freshwater lagoons, temporary pools, and swamps

Oryza meridionalis (Wild rice)

Oryza meridionalis is a wild rice indigenous to Australia. It is found at edges of freshwater lagoons, temporary pools, and swamps

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Oryza meridionalis (Wild rice)

Front view illustration of a Freycinet Sandalwood, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. It is found in the mesic to dry forests of O'ahu. The fragrant wood of this shrub or small tree has history as a significant trade commodity through the mid 19th century. Ancient Hawaiians also used the wood, bark and leaves

Santalum freycinetianum (Freycinet Sandalwood)

Front view illustration of a Freycinet Sandalwood, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. It is found in the mesic to dry forests of O'ahu. The fragrant wood of this shrub or small tree has history as a significant trade commodity through the mid 19th century. Ancient Hawaiians also used the wood, bark and leaves

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Santalum freycinetianum (Freycinet Sandalwood)

Front illustration of a Dwarf Naupaka, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. Dwarf naupaka formerly grew in coastal sites, primarily on consolidated sand dunes, on all of the main islands and was probably never very common. Today, it is endangered

Scaevola coriacea (Dwarf Naupaka)

Front illustration of a Dwarf Naupaka, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. Dwarf naupaka formerly grew in coastal sites, primarily on consolidated sand dunes, on all of the main islands and was probably never very common. Today, it is endangered

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Scaevola coriacea (Dwarf Naupaka)

Illustration of a tipi or teepee, popularized by Native Americans of the Great Plains

Tipi/Teepee (Plains Indians)

Illustration of a tipi or teepee, popularized by Native Americans of the Great Plains

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Tipi/Teepee (Plains Indians)

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